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Professionals mosaic

Professionals dedicated to disability and special needs

Splinx is open to a variety of professionals that offer services to disabled people and their families.

This is a list of all the professionals that can join Splinx for free.

Applied Behaviour Analysis is the process of studying behaviour to put into place appropriate behavioural interventions. ABA consultants use applied behaviour analysis as a form of treatment, possessing the knowledge and skills to understand how human behaviours are learned and how they can change over time. They perform assessments, design interventions and continuously monitor their clients' progress, to improve behaviours such as social skills, communication, academics or adaptive learning skills.Background, training, and experience vary widely for ABA consultants. However, The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BCBA) certifies individuals as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). To achieve this qualification therapists must have a master level degree to be a BCBA, a doctorate to have the BCBA-D, and at least a Bachelor level degree for the BCaBA.

ABA is used on both adults and children and in various settings, including homes, school, clinics, and workplaces. Here are some conditions that benefit from applied behaviour analysis:


Sources:

International board of credentials and continuing education standards


Child autism UK


BACB


Applied Behaviour Analysis is the process of studying behaviour to put into place appropriate behavioural interventions. An ABA tutor is the person who works day to day with a client, promoting skills and implementing the strategies identified by the case manager (ABA consultant). ABA tutors may work in a variety of settings, such as the client's home, nurseries, schools, and communities centres.

Some of the main tasks of an ABA tutor may include:


ABA tutors background can be very diverse. Some will have a related degree in areas such as education or psychology, but others won't. The Behaviour Analyst Certification Board (BACB) certifies Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT) with a minimum of a high school diploma and 40 hours of specialized training who work under the direct supervision of a BCBA or BCaBA.

Sources:

International board of credentials and continuing education standards


Child autism UK


BACB


Adapted swimming teachers have the knowledge, skills and required certifications to become a swimming teacher. Additionally, they have also specialised in teaching disabled swimmers and children with special educational needs. These professionals know how teaching practices can be adapted to ensure that disabled swimmers get the best from their swimming classes and can identify common barriers to learning. They will also be aware of certain conditions, syndromes, and disorders and employ strategies for managing behaviour and communicate effectively with people who have a range of difficulties including physical or sensory challenges, emotional and behavioural problems, speech and language needs and autism.

Sources:

Swimming.org


STA


Art therapy is a form of psychotherapy that uses art as a form of expression and communication to address emotional issues. Art therapists work with individuals of all ages from children to elderly and can be provided in groups or individually according to the client's needs. Clients do not need to have any previous experience or expertise in art. These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession

Individual who can benefit from art therapy may have a wide range of difficulties, disabilities or diagnoses, including:


Source:

The British association of art therapists


Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help individuals to manage their problems by changing the way they think and behave.

A cognitive behavioural therapist’s primary role is to help people identify their thoughts and behaviours, specifically regarding their relationships, surroundings, and life, so that they can influence those thoughts and behaviours for the better. The goal is to get people to reflect on their unhealthy patterns and form healthier approaches to the challenges and emotions brought about by everyday life.

The British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapists (BABCP) provides accreditation to those who practise CBT in the NHS and privately. It is widely recognised by health and social care employers, training institutions and health insurance companies.

Who can benefit from CBT:


Sources:

Mind.org


Royal College of Psychiatrists


British association for behavioural and cognitive psychotherapists(BABCP)

.

Clinical Hypnotherapy is the use of hypnosis to treat and alleviate a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. It helps to release past trauma and decondition established habits. It can be used to reach the personal unconscious where faulty learning from one’s childhood can lead to low self-esteem, underachievement, and worse. This can lead to fears and anxieties to phobic levels to keep us from a particular activity or stimulus it sees as dangerous. Utilising hypnosis in therapy often facilitates an unconscious relearning process, and results appear more easily and quickly than many other forms of treatment.

Clinical Hypnotherapists should have a Diploma / PG Cert level from a recognised training college, and be registered with the British Society of Clinical Hypnosis (BSCH). This association can guarantee the training quality of its members and set a high standard for hypnotherapy practitioners in the UK.

Sources:

British Society of Clinical Hypnosis


Anxiety UK


Psychologists who provide clinical services assess and treat mental, emotional and behavioural disorders. They aim to improve psychological health and performance of individuals, families, organisations & communities through evidence-based assessments and interventions.

These professionals work with children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, using a variety of different therapeutic models, including cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic and systemic therapies and community approaches. They may undertake a clinical assessment to investigate a clients’ situation including psychometric tests, interviews and direct observation of behaviour. This assessment may lead to advise, counseling or therapy. These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession.

Clinical psychologists deal with a wide range of mental and physical health problems including:


Sources:

Association of clinical psychologist


The British psychological society


Dramatherapy is a psychological therapy in which all of the performing arts are utilised within the therapeutic relationship. Dramatherapists are both artists and clinicians and draw on their training in theatre/drama and therapy to create methods to engage clients in effecting psychological, emotional and social changes.

Dramatherapists employ a variety of methods such as stories, role plays, puppetry, masks, and improvisation that will enable the client to explore difficult and painful life experiences through an indirect approach. This therapeutic approach can occur in groups or individually.

These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession.

Individuals that can benefit from Dramatherapy include:


Source:

The British association of dramatherapists


Educational psychologists are concerned with children and young people in educational and early years settings. These professionals apply psychological theory, research and techniques to support children, young people, their families and schools to promote the emotional and social well-being of young people. They work in collaboration with families, and other professionals, such as doctors, teachers, therapists and social workers.

These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body in order to practice their profession.

Educational psychologists tackle challenges such as:


Source:

Association of educational Psychologists


Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) is a behavioural therapy for children with autism and related disorders between the ages of 12-48 months.

ESDM therapists use play to build positive and fun relationships, promoting language, social and cognitive skills. ESDM therapy can be provided in a group setting or one-on-one; it can also be applied through a home, a clinic, or school.

This intervention focuses on boosting children’s social-emotional, cognitive, and language abilities, as development in these domains is particularly affected by autism. ESDM also uses a data-based approach and empirically supported teaching practices that have been found effective from research in applied behaviour analysis.

ESDM therapists explain and model the strategies they use so that families can practice them at home, as parent involvement is a key part of the ESDM program.

All therapists must have specific training and certification in ESDM.

Sources:

Early Start Denver Model


Autism Speaks


Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) combines cognitive behavioral techniques with mindfulness strategies in order to help individuals better understand and manage their thoughts and emotions in order to achieve relief from feelings of distress and help break the negative thought patterns that are characteristic of recurrent depression.

MBCT is proving to be a powerful tool to help prevent relapse in depression and the after effects of trauma. Evidence shows that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy can, on average, reduce the risk of relapse for people who experience recurrent depression by 43%. Research also shows that this approach could be highly effective for patients who suffered long-term physical health conditions that have been affecting the quality of their lives.

MBCT helps individuals to:


As a result, people say they:


Certification in MBCT is provided by a number of approved institutions around the world, such as, the UCSD Mindfulness-Based Professional Training Institute (United States), the Oxford Mindfulness Centre (England) and Bangor University (Wales). Therapists who are interested in gaining certification as a teacher of MBCT are required to fulfill two training phases: teacher qualification and teacher certification.

Sources:

Mindfulness Based Cognitive therapy


Mental Health Foundation


Music therapists are allied health professionals that use music to help their clients achieve therapeutic goals through the development of the musical and therapeutic relationship. Music therapists work with improvisation and the natural musicality styles and genres to offer appropriate, sensitive and meaningful musical interaction with their clients.

Music therapy sessions can have a more personal or social character, and sessions can be individual or in a group. For a child with autism, this could be helping them to find a way to communicate with others. For a learning disabled adult, this could be helping them to find a way in which to express their emotions in a safe and supported environment. For an older person with dementia, this could be helping them to feel valued and heard.

These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession.

Source:

British association for music therapy


Occupational therapists provide practical support to empower people to facilitate recovery and overcome barriers preventing them from doing the activities (or occupations) that matter to them and increase their independence and life satisfaction. They work with people of all ages and can assess and intervene in all aspects of individuals' daily life at home, school or workplace.

These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession.

Occupational therapy can help people who:


Sources:

Royal college of occupational therapists


NHS


Personal Assistants or Support Workers are professionals who care for and assist people who due to illness, disability or a mental health problem has difficulties coping without their support.

Personal assistants can have a variety of backgrounds with different levels of training and experience. It is up to the clients to select the professional that possesses the right skills and personality that matches their needs.

Some of the tasks these professionals can perform includes:


The Care Act 2014 establishes that Local Authorities are now legally obliged to offer personal budget to anyone eligible for social care funding. Qualified individuals can request some or all of your personal budgets in the form of direct payments.

Sources:

Carers UK


Disability rights UK


Skills for care


Physiotherapists help restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. They help people through movement and exercise, manual therapy, education, and advice. They maintain health for people of all ages, helping patients to manage pain and prevent disease. These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession. Who can they help?

Physiotherapists use their knowledge and skills to improve a range of conditions, such as:


Source:

Chartered society of physiotherapy


Play therapists help children improve their behaviours, self-concept and build healthy relationships.

Often, children referred to play therapy do not have the words to describe their thoughts, feelings, and perceptions of their internal and external world, however, they can use play as their form of communication.

Play therapists establish a therapeutic relationship with children which enables them to express, explore and make sense of their complicated and painful experiences, allowing them to find healthier ways of communicating,

develop fulfilling relationships, increase resiliency and facilitate emotional literacy. Play therapists work closely with the child’s parents/carers throughout the play therapy intervention and occasionally undertake parent-child relationship interventions. To provide assurance of a high standard of safety and effective practices, play therapist should be registered with the Play Therapy UK's (PTUK) accredited by the Professional Standards Authority.

Play therapists work with a range of psychological difficulties and complex life experiences, such as:


Sources:

British association of play therapists


UK society for play and creative arts therapies


Play therapy international (PTI)


Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) is a person-centred approach to people with a learning disability who may be at risk of displaying challenging behaviours. It aims to improve their lives and those people around them. PBS is backed by evidence from behavioural science and provides support based on inclusion, choice, participation, and opportunity equality PBS practitioners focus on:


PBS professionals can come from a variety of backgrounds and work in a wide range of places. There is currently no accreditation scheme for PBS professionals; however, there are three things to consider when seeing if a person is appropriately qualified:


Sources:

PBS4


The Challenging Behaviour Foundation


Psychomotor Therapists or Psychomotricists can exercise their professional activity in the therapeutic, rehabilitative, educative, and / or preventive field. Their interventions cover problems within the psychomotor development and maturation, behaviour, learning, and psycho-affective scope.

The Psychomotor Intervention is aimed at all age groups. It uses different methodologies, such as relaxation techniques and body awareness, expressive therapies, recreational activities, therapeutic recreation activities, adapted motor activity, and motor awareness activities, integrating representative and symbolic activity.

In many countries, Psychomotor therapists develop their work in the public and private sectors, including: kindergartens, schools, clients’ home, special education schools, nursing homes, institutions for people with disabilities, general and psychiatric hospitals, educational institutions, sports associations, , activity centres, and private clinics.

The psychomotor therapists must possess at least a graduate or higher degree in Psychomotricity or Psychomotor Rehabilitation Therapy.

Source:

European Forum of Psychomotricity


Special educational needs (SEN) teachers work with students who need extra support with their learning. These professionals have achieved Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) plus an extra specialisation in special needs to become SEN Teachers.

SEN Teachers can also offer home-school tutoring to children presenting special educational needs related to behavioural, social, or academic difficulties.

They can also provide one-on-one specialised support for students with a variety of conditions pertaining to specific learning difficulties. This may include the following diagnoses: dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, attention deficit, and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Sources:

UCAS


National Careers service


Special educational needs (SEN) tutors have experience and qualifications that equip them to help children and adults with special education needs with their learning. They might operate on their own or follow the guidance of a more experienced Consultant or SEN teacher.

SEN tutors can tailor their teaching goals to the needs of their students. They can offer home-school tutoring to children with special educational needs related to behavioural, social, or academic difficulties. They can provide one-on-one specialised support for children with a variety of conditions according with their expertise, namely specific learning difficulties, including dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


A special needs nanny is someone with relevant qualifications and/or experience working with children with special needs. Children with special needs can have varying development delays, communication abilities, dietary concerns, or behavioural challenges, depending on the specific situation.

These are professionals with a genuine interest in working with children with complex educational and medical needs that are willing to learn every day, are comfortable to learn from other health care professionals and can balance the right amount of therapy, care and relax time for children.

Here are some skills that a special needs nanny might have or be willing to learn:


Source:

International Nanny Association (INA)


Speech and language therapists work with a variety of individuals that have difficulties with communication, or with eating, drinking and swallowing. These allied health professionals also work with parents, carers and other professionals, such as teachers, nurses, occupational therapists, and doctors.

These professionals are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and should be registered with this professional body to practice their profession.

Speech and language therapists work with people of all ages and can be useful for:


Sources:

Royal college of speech and language therapy


Association of speech and language therapist in independent practice


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